Media: viEUws interview on digital freedom, net neutrality, copyright reform and stopping digital arms trade

Marietje
Marietje Schaake spoke to viEUw's Jennifer Baker about her recently adopted report on A Digital Freedom Strategy in the EU's Foreign Policy and related policies that are part of the EU's Digital Agenda, like intellectual property right reforms. Marietje outlines her views and discusses some of the recommendations included in her report. You can watch the full interview in three parts below. Digital Freedom On December 11th 2012 the European Parliament adopted the the first ever Digital Freedom Strategy in the EU’s foreign policy with a large majority; acknowledging that digital freedoms, like uncensored access to the internet, are fundamental rights which deserve equal protection to traditional human rights. “I think it is quite shocking that the EU is one of the key exporters of very repressive technologies and systems to countries like Syria, Iran and Egypt”. Net Neutrality Marietje Schaake explains the Netherlands is the only country in the EU – the second one in the world followed by Chile – that has secured net neutrality by law and believes this is a guarantee of competition in the digital era – not overregulation. She wants to guarantee net neutrality by law because she believes transparency and competition are not working as expected. “We so far relied on the principle of transparency: telecom operators needing to share what their practices are.” Copyright Intellectual property and copyright have been huge issues in 2012 and the debate between those that would like to see copyright reform and those that seek stricter copyright enforcement online, is becoming ever more intense. “I would invite and encourage everyone who does not like the current intellectual property rights enforcement mechanism in Europe, and I am certainly one of them, to be a part of thinking about how it should be done”. Stop Digital Arms Trade By endorsing amendments proposed by Marietje Schaake, the European Parliament wants EU export control regulation to include additional binding export controls for technologies that are used by authoritarian regimes to monitor, track and trace citizens. “Matching the context and the technology is very, very important”.